Untitled by Anne Poor

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Untitled by Anne Poor
Artist: Anne Poor Title: Untitled Medium: Oil on canvas (mounted on wood Dimensions: 17” x 9” x 1” Date: unknown Signed: yes, lower left Estimate Range: $300 Starting Bid: $150 Bidding Increments: $50 Donor Info: Tess Raso

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Artist: Anne Poor Title: Untitled Medium: Oil on canvas (mounted on wood Dimensions: 17” x 9” x 1” Date: unknown Signed: yes, lower left Estimate Range: $300 Starting Bid: $150 Bidding Increments: $50 Donor Info: Tess Raso Anne Poor (January 4, 1918 – January 12, 2002) was a painter best known for her work as a combat artist during World War II and for her landscape paintings. Anne Poor was born January 4, 1918, to Bessie Breuer. Her step-father was Henry Varnum Poor. She was educated at the Art Students League of New York, where she studied with Alexander Brook, William Zorach, and Yasuo Kuniyoshi. She attended Bennington College and spent a year in Paris through Bennington's study abroad program in 1937, drawing at the Academie Julian and Ecole Fernand Leger. While in France, she worked with Jean Lurcat and met literary figures Henry Miller and Lawrence Durrell. Anne Poor began her career painting murals with her stepfather. She assisted with his murals in Washington, D.C., on the U.S. Department of Justice and Department of Interior buildings and was a model for characters depicted in the mural. She was awarded a Works Progress Administration mural commission in 1940. She painted murals on post offices in Gleason, Tennessee, and Depew, New York. In 1943, she enlisted in the Women's Army Corps, through which she joined the War Artists Unit and was stationed in the Pacific. She was the only female artist/war correspondent in the United States Armed Forces during World War II. Anne's work was displayed in New York City at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the American-British Art Center during the 1940s. Anne was an instructor at the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture from 1947-1961.[1] She also became the director and a member of the board of trustees.