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Exhibitions

Upcoming Exhibitions

Liliane Tomasko
12 nights x dreams

 Liliane Tomasko has exhibited widely in museums and galleries across the US and Europe, and is represented in important collections worldwide. This will be Tomasko’s first exhibition in Rockland County since moving her main working studio to Tappan NY in 2015, and will offer a rare glimpse into the philosophical reverie that underpins all of the artist’s work. 

Tomasko finds inspiration in the mystery of the most mundane artifacts of domestic life: piled up bags, folded bedlinens, a dress on a hanger. One particular series of paintings, from 1999-2000, of empty beds with crumpled sheets, became central to the artist’s current direction. 

 In 2014-15 Tomasko made a series of photographs, recording the human imprints left on the bedsheets after a night’s sleep. Like a fingerprint of a night they are a record of a life in the tossing and turning, the involuntary motions of dream. This inspiration was then further honed down to a series of line drawings that use the wrinkles of a night’s sleep as the starting point for Tomasko’s painting from 2015 to date. 

 This exhibition of new work sees Tomasko honing that concept still further, using a collection of folded and stacked hotel bedlinens. Each measuring 109 x 65 inch, the scale of a twin bed, the sheets are now unfolded and drawn on with bravura strokes of spray paint, then hung with their irregular and individual grids of folds still visibly present. Semi-transparent black is contrasted with carbon black, white against the off-white fabric, and blue, create a near monochrome nightscape.

 Twelve bedsheets represent twelve nights. A night is defined as 12 hours. Twelve is a symbol of cosmic order, the number of space and time: there are 12 months in a year; 12 signs in both the Chinese and Western Zodiac; 12 tribes of Israel; and in Greek mythology there were 12 Olympian gods. The artist sleeps with her husband and child in the same bed each night, where two became three, with the addition of one. And each person dreams untold dreams each night, so from 12 the possibilities are myriad.

These dreams are made manifest in a series of multicolored drawings in which Tomasko extrapolates the plethora of possibilities that lie within the same lines of the timeworn sheets. Like jewels from a dream, the colors reveal a mindscape of oranges, pinks, reds, greens, yellows, and blues. Dynamic and brave, yet quietly luminous and reticent at the same time, the drawn marks demand recognition and then seemingly self-efface.

Recent museum exhibitions include ‘Abstract Painting Now!’, Kunsthalle Krems, Austria (2017); PIFO Gallery, Beijing, China (2017); Fundacion Bancaja, Valencia, Spain (2016); Kunsthalle Rostock, Germany (2015); Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami, Miami, USA (2015); Phoenix Art Museum, AZ, USA (2015).

Liliane Tomasko is represented by: Marc Straus, New York; Bechter Kastowsky Galerie, Vienna, Austria; Kerlin Gallery, Dublin; Blain Southern, Berlin and London.

 “12 nights x dreams” exhibit will be on view February 11 through March 11, 2018.  An opening artist reception will be held Sunday, February 11th, 1 – 4 pm.  The exhibit will be closed on Friday, Feb. 16 and opening at 1:00pm on Feb. 23.  Free to the public. Regular hours are:  Mon-Fri 10-4; Sat 1-4, and Sun 1-4 pm. 

 RoCA’s exhibitions are made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts, with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

 
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Quotidian Metamorphosis
March 25 – May 25, 2018  Opening Reception March 25, 1-4 pm

Rockland Center for the Arts is proud to present works by Jaynie Crimmins in Quotidian Metamorphosis, as part of our Spring exhibits addressing Climate Change.  Jaynie Crimmins creates alternative narratives from quotidian materials, such as promotional mailings from political organizations, consumerist advertising, and bills.  Most of this printed matter is difficult to recycle because the inks have high concentrations of heavy metals.

By shredding this mail she generates a medium that is uniform in size, assigning equal importance to all the shreds.  Creating in series, the works extract an alternative narrative through a rigorous practice of separating colors, rolling or sewing the shredded mail and commingling specific mailings.  

The fragments, shredded and then sewn past the point of re-assemblage, still reveal bits of text, imagery and colors; traces of their cultural origins.  Once a means of direct communication, her manipulation of these materials obscure their messages to reflect the form and function of fragile marine ecosystems, elevating the ordinary into extraordinary.

Reconfiguring the ordinary and overlooked aspects of our daily existence, her intimate pieces use an economy of means and restraint of process, inspired and influenced by Ruth Asawa’s practice and work.

Crimmins’ work has been exhibited at the Annual Governor’s Island Art Fair and will be traveling to the National Museum of Romanian Literature in Bucharest for the Bibliophile Book and Object Book Biennial.

Quotidian Metamorphosis exhibit is on view March 25 through May 25, 2018, with an Opening Reception March 25, 1 – 4 pm.   Free to the general public. Regular hours are:  Mon-Fri 10-4; Sat 1-4, and Sun 1-4 pm.  

 RoCA’s programs are made possible, in part, with funds from the New York State Council on the Arts, with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

 
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Aqueous Remains
March 25 – May 25, 2018 Opening Reception – March 25, 1-4 pm

Rockland Center for the Arts is proud to present Aqueous Remains, a compelling exhibition of works by Aurora Robson, exploring ecological issues and the relationship between nature and humanity. Robson is a multi-media artists known for her lively and intricate sculptures constructed from plastic debris. Her practice is about shifting trajectories as she transforms waste into aesthetic objects of beauty. Aurora Robson uses her art to inspire others to rethink and reinvent plastic waste in ways that promote creative stewardship of our global waterways.

She raises awareness of our enormous plastic waste problem and the detrimental effects on our planet. Her work helps us recognize the monumental effects of plastic waste on distant ecosystems and provides strategies towards intercepting the waste stream and upcycling discarded plastics into new objects. Robson is an eco-activist and founder of Project Vortex, an international organization of artists, architects and designers working together to reduce the amount of plastic debris littering our oceans and shorelines.

Robson's work has been featured in Sculpture Magazine, Art in America, WIRED, Art & Antiques, the cover of Green Building + Design and other publications. She is a recipient of the Pollock Krasner Grant, a New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship in Sculpture, a TED/Lincoln Re-Imagine Prize and a National Endowment for the Arts Art Work Grant.

Aqueous Remains exhibit is on view March 25 through May 25, 2018, with an Opening Reception March 25, 1-4 pm. Free to the general public. Regular hours are: Mon-Fri 10-4; Sat 1-4, and Sun 1-4 pm. RoCA’s programs are made possible, in part, with funds from the New York State Council on the Arts, with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

 
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The Tipping Point:
March 25 - May 25, 2018      Opening Reception:  March 25, 1-4 pm

Rockland Center for the Arts is proud to present The Tipping Point: Artists Address Climate Change, a compelling exhibition exploring the relationship between nature and humanity, capturing the environmental impacts of human resources. Artists present work that first appears beautiful but, ultimately, reveals damage, transmutation and the decomposed. Tipping Point offers a fresh perspective on critical environmental issues and exemplifies our capacity to understand, adapt and motivate effective action in response to this issue.

Artists J. Henry Fair, David Maisel, Alison Moritsugu, Richard Parrish, Jill Pelto, will exhibit in The Tipping Point. J. Henry Fair’s aerial view photographs bring attention to the tragic unseen effects created by the increasing demand of human consumerism, rapidly leading to the degradation of our planet. Hi photographs are mesmerizingly beautiful, yet concern and horror creep in on the realization of the true reality of the subject. They are essentially about irony and hope. All of us are living unsustainably, but with a little effort and luck, these limitations could be overcome, ensuring a secure future. Fair is committed to reveal the evidence of the devastating costs of our choices on our planet.

Alison Moritsugu paints bountiful landscapes reminiscent of the 19th century directly on wood slices with bark intact. These landscapes appear to pay homage to the idyllic Hudson River School yet is countered by the evidence of its destruction. Her work acknowledges our more complex and precarious relationship with the environment.

David Maisel’s images of radically altered terrain have transformed the practice of contemporary landscape photography. Maisel’s images of environmentally impacted sites consider the aesthetics and politics of open pit mines, rampant urbanization and sprawl, and zones of water reclamation. These surreal and disquieting images take us towards the margins of the unknown.

Jill Pelto is an Artist and a Scientist; currently a Masters of Science student studying the Antarctic Ice Sheet at the University of Maine. Her love of nature and wilderness drives her to use creativity to communicate information about extreme environmental issues with a broad audience. Jill sees nature as a work of art, and the origin of her observational skills uses her academic training and field research in Antarctica to fuel her artwork. She creates glaciogenic art with the goal of communicating scientific knowledge through art. Richard Parrish is a glass artist and an architect. He finds inspiration in both the natural and the human-made environments. His work investigates the intersections and collisions between the natural landscape and the human impositions on that landscape. It is concerned with both physical and temporal conditions, rooted in the landscape of the intermountain west in the United States.

The Tipping Point: Climate Change exhibit is on view March 25 through May 25, 2018, with an Opening Reception on March 25, 1-4 pm. Free to the general public. Regular hours are: Mon-Fri 10-4; Sat 1-4, and Sun 1-4 pm. RoCA’s programs are made possible, in part, with funds from the New York State Council on the Arts, with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

 
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